Grey Water System Legalities

Grey Water Systems are legal, Per California code and Greywateraction.com.  Under the new 2009 California grey water code, washing machine systems that do not alter the existing plumbing do not require a permit as long as the installer follows these guidelines.

The system must have an easy way to direct flow back to the sewer/septic (3 way valve). The valve must be labeled. It must also send the water to irrigate landscape plants. The system should also keep the water on the same property it is produced. It should have a maintenance manual as well. It should also discharge the graywater under a 2 inch cover of mulch, plastic shield, or stones.

The system must not contain diaper water. It must not contain hazardous chemicals such as from a home photo lab. It should have a pooling greywater or runoff. It should make sure that the graywater is not accessible to people or pets (such as in an open tub). It should include a pump, except the washing machine pump. It must also connect to the potable water supply. It should not affect other parts of the building, such as the electrical or structural components.

By installing an L2L system you will save water, irrigate more, recharge the local water table, and lessen the burden on the local sewer system, all while saving money. Take the first step toward a sustainable future in Los Angeles with 2Gwater!

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Methods of Treating Grey Water

Gray water can be recycled within the household! The only requirement to do so is using a separate plumbing system from black water, so it can be processed, treated, and stored for reuse. However, even after treating it, grey water should not be stored for a long duration as the organic chemicals in it can putrefy the water. It is also never safe to drink. Here is the first method of its treatment:

Grey Water Recycling with Purification: Water is recycled with purification where potable water (drinking water) is required, and/or for other household tasks such as washing and showering. It can be done using mechanical systems of sand filtration and lava filtration. It can also be recycled using biological systems which have treatment ponds, living walls, and constructed wetlands. The two mentioned systems make use of the natural biological principles. Water can be recycled without the biological principles as well, using distillation and/or mechanical processes (reverse osmosis) to treat large volumes of grey water so that the water can be potable again.

A Laundry to Landscape System (L2L) can help recycle and reuse the gray water right in your house. The system installation is very inexpensive, and can help reuse the grey water by routing it back to the landscape to be used again. Its installation will not only save you money, but will also create a sustainable future for California!

The easiest and least expensive first step to help fight California’s terrible drought is the installation of a Laundry to Landscape System (L2L). L2L systems use the clothes washer’s internal pump to distribute grey water directly to the receiving landscape and into the required mulch basins. The biology of the mulch basin and surrounding soil is the treatment system that digests organic debris, soap, and any potential pathogens. View this short video for a L2L overview.

Here is another method of the treatment of Grey Water:

Grey Water Recycling without Purification: Water can be recycled without purification. Water does not need to be as clean as potable water (drinking water) to be used in a lot of places. When it comes to agricultural and irrigational purposes, grey water can be recycled and reused without purification. The systems which recycle grey water without purifying them needs a supply of water. Special care must be taken so that no water stays in the system for more than 24 hours.

Second Generation Water Solutions follows the best practices when it comes to the installation of a grey water system. The Laundry to Landscape Solution can help fight California’s drought, and create a sustainable future for the next generations!

Best Practices for Grey Water System Installation

Grey water systems need to be installed keeping these few practices in mind:

  1. The grey water should not get in contact with any roots of vegetable plantation or food.
  2. If grey water is not contained within the site where it is generated, it will be considered a nuisance and will be subjected to Code Enforcement action pursuant to City Code Section 1-3 “Administrative Review of Ordinance Violations.”
  3. Even though grey water is defined as all waste water except toilet water from the household, there are still some limitations as to what can enter the grey water system. Some of these are water wasted from cleaning car parts, washing diapers, and greasy oily rags. This is because of the dangerous chemicals in them.
  4. The waste water mentioned above should be diverted to the septic system. It should not be used for irrigation.
  5. The grey water system can only direct the water to a landscape area which should be appropriate for its use.
  6. Electrical and/or structural components of a building should not be affected by the grey water system.
  7. There should be no spray irrigation connected to the grey water system.
  8. Grey water is not allowed to be stored anywhere (storage tank or tub). For it to be stored, the code requires filtration and a permit.
  9. The grey water system should be designed in such a way that it prevents any contact with humans and animals.
  10. There should be no potable water connection or a pump with the system. The pump in a washing machine is not a part of the grey water system.
  11. Grey water is not to be used for lawn irrigation. It is to be directed to irrigation basins only, which are 1 ft wide and 1 ft deep. Grey water can also be used to irrigate raised beds.
  12. The grey water system should be designed in such a way that it allows the user to direct the flow of water for irrigation, disposal, or the sewer. The direction control in the Laundry to Landscape (L2L) Schematic is called the “Three-Way Valve”.
  13. To further prevent humans and animals from coming in direct contact with the grey water, there is at least 2 inches of appropriate permeable cover (rock, soil, mulch etc) where grey water is used or released.

Second Generation Water Solutions follows all the best practices when it comes to the installation of the grey water system. This Laundry to Landscape Solution will help in fighting against Los Angeles’ terrible drought!

Best Practices to Follow for Grey Water System Installation

Grey Water System Practices to be Followed

The grey water should not get in contact with any roots of vegetable plantation or food. If grey water is not contained within the site where it is generated, it will be considered a nuisance and will be subjected to Code Enforcement action pursuant to City Code Section 1-3 “Administrative Review of Ordinance Violations.”
The waste water mentioned above should be diverted to the septic system. It should not be used for irrigation. The grey water system can only direct the water to a landscape area which should be appropriate for its use.Electrical and/or structural components of a building should not be affected by the grey water system. Even though grey water is defined as all waste water except toilet water from the household, there are still some limitations as to what can enter the grey water system. Some of these are water wasted from cleaning car parts, washing diapers, and greasy oily rags. This is because of the dangerous chemicals in them.

Grey water is not to be used for lawn irrigation. It is to be directed to irrigation basins only, which are 1 ft wide and 1 ft deep. Grey water can also be used to irrigate raised beds.The grey water system should be designed in such a way that it allows the user to direct the flow of water for irrigation, disposal, or the sewer.The grey water system should be designed in such a way that it prevents any contact with humans and animals.There should be no potable water connection or a pump with the system.  The direction control in the Laundry to Landscape (L2L) Schematic is called the “Three-Way Valve”.

There should be no spray irrigation connected to the grey water system. Grey water is not allowed to be stored anywhere (storage tank or tub). For it to be stored, the code requires filtration and a permit. The pump in a washing machine is not a part of the grey water system. To further prevent humans and animals from coming in direct contact with the grey water, there is at least 2 inches of appropriate permeable cover (rock, soil, mulch etc) where grey water is used or released.

Second Generation Water Solutions follows these best practices when it comes to the installation of a grey water system. The Laundry to Landscape Solution can help fight California’s drought, and create a sustainable future for the next generations!

Contact 2G Water Solutions

Second Generation Water Solutions is only a phone call or email away! Contact us right now to create a sustainable future using the grey water system in your house, not only for your family, but for the entire environment, and to fight California’s terrible drought!

Offices in:

Huntington Beach, CA

Palos Verdes, CA

Telephone: [714 512 8165]

Email: sales@2gwater.com

Grey Water Systems Help Fight the Droughts

There are many ways to fight California’s drought. But the easiest way to do so is by the installation of a Laundry to Landscape System. Laundry to Landscape (L2L) uses the washing machine’s internal pump to distribute grey water. It is sent directly to the landscape and the required mulch basins. The biology of the mulch basin and the soil is the actual treatment system that digests organic debris, soap, and other chemicals.

By the installation of a Laundry to Landscape Solution, you will not only save water, irrigate more, recharge the local water table, but you will also be saving money! Take the first step toward a sustainable future with 2Gwater!

Fight Droughts with 2G Water Solutions

The Drought in California!

As we all know, California has been hit by a dangerous and terrible drought. And if we don’t take an initiative right now, we could endanger not only the wildlife and the plants, but we would also be harming the next generations. But in order to fight the drought, we must first know what they are and what causes them!

Droughts can be caused by a few reasons. It happens when a region receives less than normal rainfall for a long duration or has below average precipitation.  A dry season which has very low humidity can also cause droughts. However, those are not the only reasons. A drought can also be caused by the overuse of water and overpopulation in a region where the water is consumed. Excessive farming, irrigation, erosion, deforestation are the human activities which can impact the ability of the land to hold water. Such activities also result in global climate change, which trigger droughts throughout the world.

An atmospheric or meteorological drought occurs when there is a prolonged period with less than normal precipitation. A hydrological drought occurs when there is reduced streamflow or groundwater levels. These droughts show up slowly as the stored water in the ground is not replenished after it is used. An agricultural drought happens when soil conditions and erosion occurs because of poorly planned agricultural activities which cause reduction in water available for the crops. A socioeconomic drought occurs when the demand for water is not supplied. An example of this is excessive irrigation.

This is where 2G Water Solutions Comes In

Droughts can be triggered by a number of reasons, and can be of different types. However, all of them have one thing in common: They have drastic affects on the region. To minimize and fight these effects, and to take precautions to prevent droughts, 2G (Second Generation) Water Solutions is helping average homeowners do their part to help fight the West’s drought!